Can Sitting Cancel Out the Benefits of Exercise? | easylivingtoday.com article | Atlanta Personal Trainer

Do you have a job that keeps you sitting at your desk all day? Do you commute for long periods of time? Do you get home and just want to lay in bed and watch some TV?

That’s what life is like for most people in America. We drive to work, sit at our desk all day, drive back home and then sit down to wind down after a long day of work.

Hopefully, somewhere in the midst of all of that you are fitting in some exercise!

I’ve been reading a book called “Fitter Faster” by Health Journalist Robert J Davis and Certified Personal Trainer Brad Kolowich, Jr., which discusses this, and I wanted to share it with you all.

Can Sitting Cancel Out the Benefits of Exercise?

By Robert J. Davis, Ph.D.

Author of Fitter Faster: The Smart Way to Get in Shape in Just Minutes a Day

Adapted from Fitter Faster: The Smart Way to Get in Shape in Just Minutes a Day (AMACOM) by Robert J. Davis with Brad Kolowich, Jr.  For more information, please visit https://fitterfasterplan.com/

You’ve probably heard the trendy phrase that “sitting is the new smoking.” While it’s an exaggeration to equate the two behaviors—nothing comes close to smoking in its many ruinous and deadly effects on the body—research does show that prolonged sitting may be harmful, even if you exercise regularly.

Pooling results from more than 40 studies, researchers concluded that the more time people spend on their duffs—whether at a desk, on the couch, or in the car—the greater their risk of premature death, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and especially type 2 diabetes.

Regular exercise, particularly higher levels of physical activity, appears to blunt these harmful effects somewhat but may not eliminate them entirely.

An analysis of more than a dozen studies concluded that we need at least 60 minutes a day of moderately intense exercise (such as brisk walking, doubles tennis, or ballroom dancing) to counter the increased risk of premature death due to prolonged sitting.

But another study found that the same amount of exercise – which is more than most physically active people get – doesn’t undo the negative effects of sitting on insulin levels and blood fats known as triglycerides.

The damage from prolonged sitting is thought to be due to reduced muscle activity—especially in the large muscles of the legs and back—which can decrease the body’s ability to regulate blood sugar and remove harmful blood fats.

Sitting for long periods may also adversely affect blood vessel function and increase food cravings, causing us to eat more and gain weight.

To reduce sitting time:

  • At work, stand up for a few minutes every half hour, perhaps during phone calls, coffee breaks, or meetings.
  • If possible, use a desk that lets you work both standing and seated. Or try one attached to a treadmill that allows you to slowly walk while you work.
  • In the car, park as far away as possible from the door so you’ll be able to walk more. Stand if you ride the bus or subway.
  • At home, get up regularly from your computer. Try standing and doing chores while watching TV.

Incorporating short bursts of standing and movement like this will keep you from becoming an “active couch potato” – someone who exercises and then remains largely sedentary the rest of the time.

By thinking of fitness as something that entails what you do the entire day – not just the relatively few minutes spent sweating – you’ll be able to fully reap the rewards of your workouts.

Adapted from Fitter Faster: The Smart Way to Get in Shape in Just Minutes a Day (AMACOM) by Robert J. Davis with Brad Kolowich, Jr.  For more information, please visit www.fitterfasterplan.com.

Can Sitting Cancel Out the Benefits of Exercise?

Adapted from http://www.easylivingtoday.com/can-sitting-cancel-out-the-benefits-of-exercise/

 

We hope you all enjoyed this wonderful article!

Best,

Caroline Kolowich

 

Publishers Weekly Review: FITTER FASTER | Atlanta Personal Trainer

From health journalist Davis and personal trainer Kolowich comes this precise guide to overcoming fitness barriers and exercising efficiently via high-intensity interval and circuit training. Davis and Kolowich break down the process of getting fit into four key parts: get ready, get smart, get more out of exercise, and get going. They begin with motivational facts: in addition to increasing life expectancy and improving health, exercise also enables better sex and sleep, among other benefits. Instead of providing specific motivation plans, the authors provide thoughtful advice that is widely applicable: make a game plan, make winning a goal, and reward yourself. Part two details the fundamentals of aerobic activity, strength training, and stretching, and part three gives instructions on what to consume (protein, complex carbs, water) and how to prevent “bad pain.” The final section presents a varied, customizable workout regimen that can also be done in as little as 15 minutes. What separates this guide from others is its commitment to facts and plans backed by science and research; throughout, the authors debunk myths and answer questions such as “Does sex before physical activity impair athletic performance?” and “Does more sweating mean a more intense workout?” This is an important read for exercise hopefuls and aficionados alike. (June)

Book Review found on: http://www.publishersweekly.com/978-0-8144-3771-1

Book Review: Fitter Faster | Atlanta Personal Trainer

 

April 2017 Newsletter | Atlanta Personal Trainer

We hope you all are having an eggcellent April!

The Studio Team

Dr. Mercola’s Nutrition Plan | Atlanta Personal Trainer

By Dr. Mercola

If you’re looking for the best strategy to dramatically improve your health, then you’ve come to the right place.

Many people today struggle with weight issues, diseases, and other health problems that impair their ability to enjoy life. Many resort to pharmaceutical drugs and other conventional methods to relieve their symptoms, but these are actually just Band-Aid solutions that typically result in more harm than good.

What they don’t realize is that they can significantly improve their health by just changing their diet and eating habits. And this program will help you achieve exactly that.

Fact: High-Quality Fat Is One of the Most Important Nutrients for You

Conventional physicians, nutritionists, and public health experts have long claimed that dietary fat promotes heart disease and obesity. This deception caused people to follow conventional low-fat, high-carb diets, which ruined the health of millions. Today, the general guideline for dietary fat intake is that it should only be 10 percent of your overall diet.

I believe that this is one of the most destructive health recommendations that have pervaded the U.S. food system, because you need at least 50 to 75 percent of your daily calorie intake in the form of healthy fats. This is one of the basic principles that I have incorporated in my Nutritional Plan.

So what is good fat and how can you distinguish it from unhealthy ones? We’ll discuss this more in detail as you go along this program.

Saturated fats from animal and vegetable sources are an important component of this program, as they provide you with a number of important health benefits and help in the proper functioning of your:

– Immune System

– Cell Membranes

– Heart

– Lungs

– Liver

– Bones

– Hormones

– Genetic Regulation

Saturated fats also promote satiety, reducing your hunger pangs so you avoid binge eating and unhealthy food cravings. By following this high-fat, low-carb diet, you will be able to optimize your weight and avoid virtually all chronic degenerative diseases.

This Optimized Healthy Food Pyramid Will Turn Your Health Around

The original food pyramid created by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) promotes a diet that has grains, pasta, and bread at its base (meaning they make up the majority of your diet) and fats at the top, or the smallest portion. But this can spell trouble, as grains break down into sugar in your body, driving insulin and leptin resistance.

I strongly believe that for optimal health, you should follow the opposite: increase your intake of healthy saturated fats and limit your grain and sugar intake. I’ve created my own Food Pyramid based on this ratio.

Mercola-Food-Pyramid-v2

I also believe that you should always be conscious of what you eat – this means avoiding all processed foods that are loaded with additives, harmful chemicals, and genetically engineered ingredients that could put your health at risk.

9-unhealthy-foods-hires

 

Adapted from:

http://www.mercola.com/nutritionplan/index.htm

 

February 2017 Newsletter | Atlanta Personal Trainer

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Brad in Georgia State Homes Article | Atlanta Personal Trainer

Make sure to check out this amazing article, “Atlanta Personal Trainer and Lifelong Fitness Enthusiast Focuses on Individual Improvement,” by Kelly Church featuring Brad!

To view the article, click on the picture below:

fullsizer

 

Congrats, Brad!  Your dedication, hard work and passion for health, fitness and helping others continues to be such an inspiration to us all.  Not only are you all of the above, but you are also one of the most genuine and positive individuals I have ever met.  Thanks for being you!

& to our wonderful clients, thank YOU for being you.  Our team is so happy and lucky to have you all!

I hope you all have a wonderful weekend!

Caroline Kolowich

December 2016 Newsletter | Atlanta Personal Trainer

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Brad Co-Authors “FITTER FASTER” | Atlanta Personal Trainer

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FITTER FASTER

THE SMART WAY TO GET IN SHAPE IN JUST MINUTES A DAY

We are excited to share that “FITTER FASTER” will be released in the Spring of 2017!!!

A huge thank you to my friend Dr Robert Davis, our wonderful publisher American Management Association, our proof readers and editors, Mandy Malool for bearing with me through countless long days, nights, and weekends, and the many others involved in helping make this dream a reality. Thank you, thank you!

 

Brad Kolowich Jr

 

15 Reasons to Keep Coconut Oil in Your Bathroom | Atlanta Personal Trainer

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By Dr. Mercola

While multiple companies manufacture and market “new and improved” FMCGs — fast- moving consumer goods — that we use every day, such as soap, toothpaste, deodorant and body lotion, one of the best and most natural products has been right under our noses, so to speak.

Coconut oil has a pleasant scent, and besides being very economical, it’s an amazingly versatile and therapeutic substance. Since the mid-1990s, roughly, coconut oil for a number of applications, such as cleansing, deodorizing and healing, has been growing on the larger population.

Questions like “Where does coconut oil actually come from?” and “What does it smell like?” are apropos. Coconut oil, like butter, is a solid substance, melting to a liquid form when it reaches about 76 degrees.

Insoluble at room temperature, it takes on a creamy consistency when blended with water using a whisk. If not treated to processes such as bleaching, refining or deodorizing, coconut oil exudes the mild fragrance you would expect — like coconut.

2 Kinds of Coconut Oil — Commercial Grade and Virgin

The relatively recent interest in the many uses of coconut oil also elicits questions regarding its production. There are two basic types: Commercial-grade and virgin coconut oil.

Commercial grade coconut oil — This product is made from copra, which is the dried meat of the coconut. It’s usually smoke-, sun- or kiln-dried or a combination of the three. But when standard copra is used to make coconut oil, it’s not sterile and therefore unsuitable for human consumption.

It’s “purified” or refined through a process known as RBD — refined, bleached and deodorized. According to Coconutdiet.com:1

“High heat is used to deodorize the oil, and the oil is typically filtered through (bleaching) clays to remove impurities. Sodium hydroxide is generally used to remove free fatty acids and prolong shelf life. 

This is the most common way to mass-produce coconut oil. The older way of producing refined coconut oil was through physical/mechanical refining. More modern methods also use chemical solvents to extract all the oil from the copra for higher yields.”

Virgin coconut oil — In comparison, like olive oil, coconut oil is best when “first-pressed” and “virgin.” Like pressing a teabag that’s been steeping in boiled water a few minutes, the first water released will contain the most actual extracts.

The second time it’s pressed, as in the teabag analogy, the result isn’t as concentrated. Coconutdiet.com continues:

“Virgin Coconut Oil can only be achieved by using fresh coconut meat or what is called non-copra. Chemicals and high heating are not used in further refining, since the natural, pure coconut oil is very stable with a shelf life of several years. 

There are currently two main processes of manufacturing Virgin Coconut Oil:

    • Quick drying of fresh coconut meat which is then used to press out the oil. Using this method, minimal heat is used to quick dry the coconut meat, and the oil is then pressed out via mechanical means.
    • Wet-milling. With this method, the oil is extracted from fresh coconut meat without drying first. ‘Coconut milk’ is expressed first by pressing. 

The oil is then further separated from the water. Methods which can be used to separate the oil from the water include boiling, fermentation, refrigeration, enzymes and mechanical centrifuge.”

Why Keep Coconut Oil in the Bathroom?

Raw, organic coconut oil, besides being good enough to eat (which we’ll discuss in a minute) has a plethora of benefits apart from actual ingestion. Here’s a list of 15 benefits of coconut oil, in no particular order:

1. Smooth shave — If you’ve been plagued by red, irritated and razor-burned skin after shaving, coconut oil is both soothing and antibacterial.

2. Rash recovery — Other rash problems from diaper rash to mild allergic reactions can be remedied using coconut oil. Propylene glycol is one chemical found in commercial moisturizers that can cause skin irritation and dermatitis.

3. Lip balm — Use coconut oil to moisturize, nourish and hydrate chapped lips without inadvertently eating endocrine disruptors.

A study on the metal content in lip balm revealed lead, aluminum, cadmium, chromium and manganese in high concentrations, some associated with reproductive, developmental or other adverse health effects.2

4. Facial cleanser — Effective as a face wash, mixing equal parts coconut oil and castor oil is known as oil cleansing. Massage it into your skin and remove gently with a warm washcloth.

Ninety percent of the body washes and cleansers you buy contain harmful chemicals such as sodium lauryl sulfate or sodium laureth sulfate, which, in combination with other chemicals, can form cancer-causing nitrosamines.3Coconut oil can even improve acne.

5. Makeup remover — Not only can you cleanse your face, you can remove use it as a natural makeup remover — even stubborn mascara and eyeliner.

6. Night cream — While you may not want to use coconut oil under makeup, applying it lightly before bed will hydrate your skin because its fatty acids form a natural emollient. If the skin around your nails is hard and peeling, treat your cuticles to a soothing coconut oil rub to keep them soft.

7. Deodorant — A tiny dab of coconut mixed, if you desire, with an essential oil such as lavender is very effective — so much better than the antiperspirants containing aluminum, which is linked to Alzheimer’s.

Another deodorant recipe combines 3 tablespoons each of coconut oil, arrowroot powder (or cornstarch) and baking soda.

8. Foot fungus fighter — Because it’s antimicrobial and antibacterial, coconut is very effective in combating athlete’s foot. Rub it on the bottoms of your feet after every shower.

Antiviral, antibacterial and antifungal compounds in coconut oil have been shown to inactivate microorganisms such as bacteria, yeast and fungi.4

9. Soothing bath — As an alternative to bubble baths that may induce urinary tract infections, especially in children, drop a dollop of coconut oil in your bath with a few essential oils. It’s both moisturizing and helps kill bacteria.

10. Body scrub — Combining equal parts coconut oil with sea salt, sugar or baking soda to make a homemade scrub softens, smoothes and moisturizes your skin.

11. Body lotion — Moisturizers you buy at the store typically contain harmful chemicals such as aluminum, phthalates, parabens, formaldehyde and propylene glycol.5 Coconut is a fragrant, moisturizing alternative containing none of these.

12. Toothpaste — To combat tooth decay and even whiten teeth, make a DIY coconut oil toothpaste by mixing 1 teaspoon with 1/2 teaspoon baking soda and 2 drops of peppermint essential oil. Just brush as usual.

13. Oil pulling — An oral rinse works much like a mouthwash, only you shouldn’t gargle with it. As you swish vigorously for five to 15 minutes, it penetrates the soft tissue between your gums and “pulls out” bacteria that causes cavities, plaque and bad breath.

14. When applied to infected cuts or wounds, coconut oil develops a layer of naturally protective chemicals that also keep out dust, fungi, bacteria and viruses. Applied to bruises, it speeds up the healing process in damaged tissues.

15. Frizz fighter — People with hair that tends to frizz often turn to silicone- or alcohol-based gels and mousses, which coat the hair, prevent it from absorbing moisture and dries out the hair shaft. Just a few drops of coconut oil are all you need for a natural hair conditioner for smooth, silky shine.

Healing Properties of Coconut Oil

Virgin coconut oil has been described as having a “haunting, nutty, vanilla flavor (and) even milder and richer-tasting than butter.” A New York Times article noted that coconut oil, while once demonized by the “all saturated fats are bad for you” camp, has now become accepted:

“The main saturated fat in coconut oil is lauric acid, a medium-chain fatty acid. Lauric acid increases levels of good HDL, or high-density lipoprotein, and bad LDL, or low-density lipoprotein, in the blood, but is not thought to negatively affect the overall ratio of the two. 

… Any number of health claims have been made for lauric acid. According to proponents, it’s a wonder substance with possible antibacterial, antimicrobial, antiviral properties that could also, in theory, combat H.I.V., clear up acne and speed up your metabolism.”6

Even applied topically, coconut oil has healing properties. One interesting factoid is that while antiperspirants containing aluminum are associated with Alzheimer’s, coconut oil actually prevents it because of the medium-chain fatty acids (MCFA) that are easily absorbed and metabolized by the liver and can convert to ketones. One study noted:

“Ketone bodies are an important alternative energy source in the brain, and may be beneficial to people developing or already with memory impairment, as in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) … (It may also) be beneficial in the treatment of obesity, dyslipidaemia, elevated LDL, insulin resistance and hypertension — these are the risk factors for (heart disease) and type 2 diabetes, and also for AD.”7

Alzheimer’s is projected to affect 1 in 4 Americans in the next generation, rivaling obesity and diabetes, but evidence suggests that ketone bodies in coconut oil may help restore and renew neurons and nerve function in your brain, even after damage has set in.

Unhealthy Alternatives to Coconut Oil

Regarding coconut oil in the kitchen, even as a household cleaner, there are a few points to consider:

• Virgin coconut oil has a smoke point of 350 degrees, so for cooking, it’s best used at lower temperatures. Olive oil overcooks even as low as 250 degrees, which may cause oxidization, doing your body more harm than good.

• You can substitute coconut oil for butter or olive oil, and most definitely instead of so-called vegetable oils. Here’s why:

Multiple studies reveal coconut oil to impart amazing benefits when used in nutritional applications. One of the most dramatic changes you can make in your health will be to replace the so-called “healthy” vegetable, soy, corn and cottonseed oils such as canola when sautéing food or baking cake or cookies.

It’s interesting to note that Polynesian populations, who’ve been using full-fat coconut oil as a diet staple for untold generations, have no heart disease to speak of. Why? It’s a direct contradiction to what conventional medicine touted for a few decades, that saturated fats are bad for you, and will lead to obesity, high cholesterol levels, heart disease and Alzheimer’s.

The truth is, saturated fat like that of coconut oil and olive oil is natural, not the concocted substances created in a laboratory using methods like hydrogenation and partial hydrogenation that convert polyunsaturated fatty acids to trans fats. Vegetable and seed oils undergo the double whammy of hydrogen atoms and high heat, creating a cheaper oil with a long shelf life that’s very bad for your health.

Further, when vegetable oils are heated to a high temperature, the chemical compounds break down, get “stuck” in your cells, oxidize and create dangerous free radicals that lead to disease, including heart disease and cancer. Here’s a timeless article on the type of oil you should cook with.

 

Adapted from:

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/09/26/coconut-oil-benefits.aspx